Skip to content
the dual in Arabic

The dual in Arabic - الْمُثَنَّى

Introduction

In English, we differentiate between singular and plural forms. In contrast, Arabic encompasses three numerical distinctions: singular, plural, and the unique dual form.

 

 

المُفْرَدُ

Singular

 

 

 

 

الْمُثَتَّى

Dual

 

 

 

الْجَمْعُ

Plural

 

1. Crafting the Dual Form in Arabic

In Arabic, the linguistic beauty of expressing pairs is captured by the dual form, a grammatical feature absent in many languages. This form is articulated by a distinct set of suffixes, carefully chosen based on the case and gender of the nouns.

 

  1. General Dual Formation: The fundamental blueprint for crafting the dual form requires affixing the combination of a fatha, an alif, and finally, a noon endowed with a kasrah, represented as:
  • ـانِ
  1. Nominative Case (حَالةُ الرَّفَعِ): When dealing with nouns in the nominative case, a slight variation in suffix emerges. Here, the suffix takes on the pattern of a fatha, a sukoon, and subsequently a noon accompanied by a kasrah:
  • ـيْنِ
  1. Accusative and Genitive Cases for Masculine Nouns: Masculine nouns, when in the accusative or genitive cases, adhere to the aforementioned patterns. It’s crucial to recognize the case to apply the appropriate suffix, ensuring grammatical correctness and preserving the eloquence of the Arabic language.

A. Masculine dual in Arabic

Nominative case

Accusative case

Genitive case

Illustration from the Qur'an:

 

وَأَمَّا الْجِدَارُ فَكَانَ لِغُلَامَيْنِ يَتِيمَيْنِ فِي الْمَدِينَةِ

 

“And as for the wall, it belonged to two orphan boys in the city” (18:82)

 

B. Feminine dual in Arabic

In the Arabic language, feminine nouns typically conclude with the distinct character known as ‘Ta Marbouta’ (ة). However, when shifting to the dual form, this ‘Ta Marbouta’ undergoes a transformation into the more conventional ‘Ta maftooha’ (ت).

 

Upon this transition, the feminine nouns adopt suffixes similar to their masculine counterparts for the dual form. Specifically, they embrace:

 

  • ـانِ
  • ـَيْنِ

Thus, the rules for dual formation in feminine nouns align closely with those for masculine nouns in this context.

 

Here are some illustrative examples to further clarify this grammatical principle:

Nominative case

Singular

 

 مُسْلِمَةٌ

 

A muslim

 

 

 

Dual 

 

مُسْلِمَتَانِ 

 

two muslims

 

 

 

Accusative case

Singular

 

مُسْلِمَةً

 

 

A muslim  

 

 

Dual 

 

مُسْلِمَتَيْنِ

 

 

Two muslims  

 

Genitive case

Illustration from the Qur'an:

 

جَعَلْنَا لِأَحَدِهِمَا جَنَّتَيْنِ مِنْ أَعْنَابٍ

 

We granted to one of them two gardens of grapevines (18:32)

 

 

 

وَلِمَنْ خَافَ مَقَامَ رَبِّهِ جَنَّتَانِ

 

 

But for he who has feared the position of his Lord are two gardens (55:46)

Conclusion

This lesson on Arabic nuances concludes here. Insha’Allah, our subsequent session will delve into the plural forms in Arabic.

 

Al-dirassa Institute invites you on a linguistic journey with our expert teachers to master the Arabic language. Should you wish to further your studies, we welcome your inquiries.

Chosen and Trusted by Thousands of Satisfied Learners

Discover the experiences of our delighted clients who have thoroughly enjoyed utilizing this standout feature.

Laura Pociene
Laura Pociene
Verified ownerVerified owner
5/5

I want to say a big thanks to IMAN

Verified reviewVerified review - view original

6 months ago
Saida
Saida
Verified ownerVerified owner
5/5

Alhamdulillah I‘m very pleased with the arabic and Qur’an lessons I receive from teacher Umm Tasneem and I‘m also content with the al-dirassa administration team who were very quick in answering any questions I had. In a month I progressed a lot and I cannot wait to continue my studies with al-dirassa. May Allah reward everyone at al-dirassa.

Verified reviewVerified review - view original

11 months ago
Anonymous
Anonymous
Verified ownerVerified owner
3/5

Very good

Verified reviewVerified review - view original

1 year ago
Nabeela
Nabeela
Verified ownerVerified owner
5/5

My Qur’an teacher is fantastic, she teaches me in a loving and kind way where I look forward to the lessons and learn so much. My Arabic teacher is equally as nice and has a lot of patience with me, she has great expertise in the field and I’ve progressed really quickly with her. Thank you Al-dirassa!

Verified reviewVerified review - view original

1 year ago
Anonymous
Anonymous
Verified ownerVerified owner
3/5

Some of the teacher are very good

Verified reviewVerified review - view original

1 year ago

Book your free trial lesson

 

Don’t want to go through the translation anymore?

30 free minutes with your qualified Egyptian teacher.

 
Rated by our students: 4.7 / 5
4.7/5

Arabic For Beginners for FREE

GET NOW YOUR EBOOK FOR FREE

free arabic book

Al-dirassa Institute offers you a gift to help you begin your journey to being fluent in Arabic and learning the Quran.

Arabic For Beginners for FREE

GET NOW YOUR EBOOK FOR FREE

free arabic book

Al-dirassa Institute offers you a gift to help you begin your journey to being fluent in Arabic and learning the Quran.